Menu

Dr. Sherry Weaver

If you plan on trimming your dog’s nails, ask your veterinary staff to show you how to trim nails to keep them close to the quick (live part of the toenail). But be aware, just about everyone who tries to trim their own dog’s toenails will at one point clip them too short. This may result in what seems like severe bleeding.

To perform first aid on a fractured or broken nail, try to determine if there is a loose piece that can simply be trimmed with a nail clipper. If a fractured end or nail fragment is attached merely by a small strand, cut the loose piece away. If the nail is fractured but still well attached a little super glue may stabilize it until your veterinarian can check it for actual trimming and coagulation of the quick.

To stop bleeding from a nail that is trimmed too close to the quick or broken away from the quick, you can pack the end of the nail with bar soap, styptic powder, cornstarch, flour, or tea leaves from a tea bag. Pack the coagulant up against the bleeding quick, and hold it there for a minute or two. Remember, animals in pain sometimes bite out of self-preservation instincts, so keep an eye on your animal. Occasionally a nail that breaks off very close to the nail bed results in an infection in the toe. This will require a veterinary clinic visit and antibiotic treatment, so watch for any limping that persists longer than two days.

0

Comment on the Story Below

Related Posts

June 18, 2015

How To Find The Right In-Home Dog Boarding Host

So you’ve planned your dream vacation and you’ve made your checklist. Plane tickets? Check. Hotel...
December 3, 2015

Los Síntomas De Gusanos En Perros

Los gusanos son uno de los problemas de salud más comunes en los perros. Hay...
June 18, 2015

Dog Care: Eye Injuries

By Dr. Cerny Surprisingly, dogs have few serious eye injuries. Any injury to the eye...
Comments – Rules , Boundaries & Limitations

At Cesar’s Way , we strive to be a single pack, and packs have rules, and limitations. Here are ours for the comments:

  •  No bullying or harassment of fellow commenters. Keep it civil!
  • No foul language or obscenities, please.
  • No posting of external links

Also, please note that because of volume , we are unable to respond to individual comments, although we do watch them in order to learn what issues and questions are most common so that we can produce content that fulfills your needs. You are welcome to share your own dog tips and behavior solutions among yourselves, however Thank you for reading our articles and sharing your thoughts with the pack!

Trending Today

Trending This Week