Health Care Issues

How To Recognize And Handle Dog Seizures

    Most pet owners probably don’t know this, but dogs can have seizures just like humans. Few things are worse than seeing your four-legged friend suddenly flop to the ground and tread water that isn’t even there, but for some dogs, this is their reality. So how do you know if your dog has or may get seizures? And what should you do if they start experiencing them? Causes of Epileptic Seizures in Dogs Some causes of seizures in dogs are preventable, but others are genetic or related to illness. Common reasons can be divided into several different categories:

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All About Dogs

Blood And Hounds

In Episode 3 of the second season of “Cesar 911,” Cesar visited a veterinary hospital to help an over-excited dog that was used as a universal blood donor to other dogs. Now, unless you’ve ever gone through the experience of your dog having to have a transfusion, you may not even have been aware that dogs, like humans, do have blood types, but that’s where the similarity ends. Human blood types You’re probably familiar with the human blood types O, A, B, and AB, which come in both “positive” and “negative” varieties. What these letters refer to are the most

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All About Dogs

Carsick And Vomiting Dog Problem

Help with Carsick and Vomiting Dog Dear Cesar, I have 2 Cavachon dogs. My boy dog rides in the car easily and enjoys it, but my 1 ½-year old girl dog salivates the WHOLE time she is in the car and if the ride is more than 15 minutes she will vomit EVERY time. It’s REALLY bad. What can I do about my dog vomiting in the car? She doesn’t seem to be outgrowing it at all and the dog vomiting prevents either of them from getting to go in the car, which is a shame since my boy dog

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All About Dogs

What Makes My Dog Itch?

If your dog is frequently scratching, you may suspect a problem with fleas. But fleas are far from the only cause of skin irritations and itches. Insect bites and stings are fairly common on dogs. Some cause minimal to no symptoms, while others can cause a life threatening allergic reaction. The most common signs of an insect bite are redness and swelling at the site of the bite. In more severe reactions, hives may appear along with swelling of the face and muzzle. If a dog is sensitive to proteins in the insect’s venom or saliva, you may see more

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Constipation

Dr. Sherry Weaver If the animal is still passing stool but it appears to be very firm-and the animal is otherwise healthy, i.e. normal eating and drinking habits, add 1/4 teaspoon of fiber, such as canned pumpkin or bran to the animal’s diet. If this does not work, your pet has not defecated for more than one day, or your pet appears otherwise ill, take the animal to a veterinarian. Never use commercially-sold enemas made for humans. These may be toxic and deadly to dogs and cats! 0

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Dog Care

Hit By Car

Dr. Sherry Weaver Do not panic. Let the animal see you approach. Avoid making any sudden movements or loud noises. Speak gently to the animal. Ensure there is no danger of further damage to yourself or pet. Give first aid to any external injuries, minimize movement, and keep the animal warm. Immediate attention is required. Telephone your vet, and take your pet to the hospital immediately. 0

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All About Dogs

Hypoallergenic Dogs: Not So Allergy Friendly?

As one in five people in Western countries are said to show symptoms of dog allergies, hypoallergenic dogs have become increasingly popular throughout years. Dog lovers who experience itchy eyes and watery noses have sought out breeds such as the bichon frise, labradoodle, and poodle that are said to produce less dander and therefore make good pets for allergy sufferers. If you are allergic to dogs and thinking about getting a hypoallergenic breed, you might want to read this. A new study suggests that hypoallergenic dogs might not in fact be so allergy friendly. The study, published in the American

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Fever

By Dr. Sherry Weaver Fever is the elevation of body temperature in response to infection or inflammation.The normal body temperature ranges for dogs is 100-103. Abnormal things to be noticed on the thermometer would be blood, diarrhea, or black and tarry stool. These symptoms require veterinary attention 0

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hot spots on dogs - cesar’s way
Dog Care

Hot Spots On Dogs: Causes And Treatment

Hot spots are an irritating skin condition that affects countless dogs every year. Without proper care, hot spots will continue to grow, causing increased pain levels and itchiness for dogs. Fortunately, with both time and care, hot spots on dogs can be treated for and prevented. Here, Dr. Henry Cerny, DVM, MS of Yankee Hill Veterinary Hospital, answers some common questions about hot spots on dogs and how to treat these painful sores. What are Hot Spots on Dogs? A hotspot (also known as Pyotraumatic dermatitis or moist dermatitis) is a condition that involves an area of skin that has

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Dog Care

Can Your Dog Catch The Flu?

By Nicole Pajer UPDATE, January 30, 2018:  Time.com recently reported on a breakout of dog flu in several states, including California.  The strain affecting dogs is canine H3N2, a different strain than the similarly named human H3N2. Flu season has arrived—for humans and for dogs. As people march into medical centers to nab their annual vaccination, veterinarians across the country are recommending that dog owners consider a similar immunization for their four-legged companions. The canine flu (H3N8) aka “the dog flu” is a contagious respiratory infection that was first discovered in 2004 when the virus jumped from horses and began

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