Health Care Issues

A pet owner picks up his dog's poop.
Diagnosing Your Dog

The Scoop In The Poop: Your Dog’s Health Secrets Revealed

It may be an unpleasant reality but a necessary subject. Dog lovers have to deal with their dogs’ poop constantly, whether it’s cleaning up the yard, picking it up on a walk, or (we hope rarely if ever) scrubbing it off of a floor. While it may be tempting to try to look (and smell) the other way while taking care of a dog’s business, there’s actually quite a lot you can learn by paying attention to what’s coming out the other end, because various attributes of dog poop can tell you a lot about the health of your dog

Read More »
A dog sniffing at rat poison
Dog Care

Bromethalin: The Invisible Killer Lying In Wait For Your Dog

There’s a hidden danger to your dogs that’s probably lurking around houses, apartment buildings, and offices and you may not even notice it. It’s extremely lethal in incredibly small amounts. Its name sounds rather innocuous: bromethalin — although it’s anything but. How did it get there? In an attempt to deal with one of humanity’s oldest nemeses: the rat. A short history of rats Rats have been a constant companion of humankind for as long as dogs have been, although a generally unwanted one. They have been associated with many diseases that can be transmitted to humans, were partly responsible

Read More »
A dog looks at a turkey thinking about eating it.
Dog Care

Deadly Feast: Protecting Our Dogs At Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is an exciting time to be a dog. There are interesting smells, tons of people to give you attention, and — best of all — the opportunity to snag some delicious table scraps. As Pack Leaders we have to exercise caution, though all table scraps might look delicious to a dog, not all Thanksgiving food is good for them. If your dog gets into the wrong food, he can become quite ill. Nothing puts a damper on holiday festivities like having to rush your pooch to the emergency care center. So what should you watch out for? Things to

Read More »
Dog Care

Garden Dangers For Dogs: Common Plants That Can Kill

Unlike their feline counterparts, dogs aren’t strict carnivores. They have evolved with a scavenging instinct, causing them to eat whatever might fulfill their nutritional needs. They also have a penchant for exploring the world around them with their mouth. Unfortunately, as many Pack Leaders know, this results in dogs eating many things that aren’t very good for them. Dark chocolate, moldy garbage, and even rat poison are all dangerous items that dogs can and will eat inside the house given the chance. But outside in the garden, there are plants that can pose a threat to your pup as well.

Read More »
A dog gets a lump checked by the veterinarian. His owner noticed a strange mass and decided to have it looked at for evaluation. Early detection is essential
Diagnosing Your Dog

10 Early Signs Your Dog May Have Cancer

Early Warning Signs of Cancer There are many early warning signs of cancer in dogs and cats. Some of them can be very vague such as vomiting and diarrhea, and others can be self-explanatory, such as large lumps on the body that are easily observed and felt. Cancer is more common in older dogs and cats, but we must remember that even young dogs and cats can develop cancer. As I mentioned above, any noticeable lumps or bumps on the body, head, or legs could potentially be a cancerous tumor. Hard nodes that are well-attached to underlying tissues are more

Read More »
A dog digs in a trash can that was knocked over.
All About Dogs

What To Do If Your Dog Eats Something It Shouldn’t

Have you ever heard the expression “eat like a dog” or “dogs eat anything?” Ever wonder where those stem from? If you own a dog, you know firsthand that from time to time they get curious and occasionally try to ingest something that they shouldn’t. We’ve all heard horror stories of a dog having to be rushed to the ER to have his stomach pumped, or know of a person whose pup has passed a foreign object and was back to normal immediately after. What should you do if your dog eats something that he shouldn’t? Should you take him

Read More »
brown dog scratching fleas
Dog Care

Fleas And Ticks And Burrs — Oh My!

Summertime means sunshine, backyard barbecues, and lots of fun. But for your dog, the season unfortunately comes with a few hitches. Spending more time outdoors increases your pup’s chances of getting burrs, fleas, and even ticks. Read on for the best tips on how to combat the summer’s puppy predicaments. Getting Rid of Fleas For a pet owner, the arrival of warm, humid summer weather also means it’s flea season once again. If you happen to find the annoying little insects on your baby, remember to treat your house at the same time you treat your hound to prevent re-infestation.

Read More »
A dog does not want to take his medicine.
Dog Care

How To Get Your Dog To Take Their Medicine

It is a well-known fact that both dogs and kids hate to take their medicine. Since dogs cannot grab a cup of water to swallow a pill, you have to a bit more resourceful. Medication is a necessary evil, and you will have to figure out some way to make it work whether you put it in their dinner, treats, or water. Here Are Some Solutions to Help Your Dog Take Oral Medications Use Food Food is your friend when it comes to coaxing dogs into taking their medication. You can put a pill or even liquid medication in the

Read More »
All About Dogs

What Makes My Dog Itch?

If your dog is frequently scratching, you may suspect a problem with fleas. But fleas are far from the only cause of skin irritations and itches. Insect bites and stings are fairly common on dogs. Some cause minimal to no symptoms, while others can cause a life threatening allergic reaction. The most common signs of an insect bite are redness and swelling at the site of the bite. In more severe reactions, hives may appear along with swelling of the face and muzzle. If a dog is sensitive to proteins in the insect’s venom or saliva, you may see more

Read More »
All About Dogs

New Canine Cancer Blood Test Available

The National Canine Cancer Foundation in Phoenix has announced that a new, simple blood test is now available for dog lovers to confirm veterinary suspicion of cancer in their pets. Developed by Veterinary Diagnostics Institute, which is a reference laboratory based in Simi Valley, California, the test is called VDI TKcanine+. It is used by veterinarians to measure two compounds in the dog’s blood: the thymidine kinase (or TK) level, which indicates unusually rapid cell division; and levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), which indicates when inflammation is present. Together, these measurements detect cancer in its early stages before signs become

Read More »

Trending Today

Trending This Week

Categories