First Aid

Diarrhea

By Dr. Sherry Weaver Diarrhea is the frequent and repetitive passage of loose, watery stool. Your judgment regarding the health status of a pet with diarrhea is critical. Bloody diarrhea with severe straining may be an emergency especially for small dogs. Diarrhea along with vomiting can be signs of serious intestinal obstruction that may even need surgery. Weakness, pain, vomiting, or agitation are serious signs that the pet needs medical attention-not simply a little first aid! A pet with diarrhea but with few other signs of distress may sometimes be treated at home, but the variables are so numerous that

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Constipation

Dr. Sherry Weaver If the animal is still passing stool but it appears to be very firm-and the animal is otherwise healthy, i.e. normal eating and drinking habits, add 1/4 teaspoon of fiber, such as canned pumpkin or bran to the animal’s diet. If this does not work, your pet has not defecated for more than one day, or your pet appears otherwise ill, take the animal to a veterinarian. Never use commercially-sold enemas made for humans. These may be toxic and deadly to dogs and cats!

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Fever

By Dr. Sherry Weaver Fever is the elevation of body temperature in response to infection or inflammation.The normal body temperature ranges for dogs is 100-103. Abnormal things to be noticed on the thermometer would be blood, diarrhea, or black and tarry stool. These symptoms require veterinary attention

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hot spots on dogs - cesar’s way
Dog Care

Hot Spots On Dogs: Causes And Treatment

Hot spots are an irritating skin condition that affects countless dogs every year. Without proper care, hot spots will continue to grow, causing increased pain levels and itchiness for dogs. Fortunately, with both time and care, hot spots on dogs can be treated for and prevented. Here, Dr. Henry Cerny, DVM, MS of Yankee Hill Veterinary Hospital, answers some common questions about hot spots on dogs and how to treat these painful sores. What are Hot Spots on Dogs? A hotspot (also known as Pyotraumatic dermatitis or moist dermatitis) is a condition that involves an area of skin that has

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Dog Care

Can Your Dog Catch The Flu?

By Nicole Pajer UPDATE, January 30, 2018:  Time.com recently reported on a breakout of dog flu in several states, including California.  The strain affecting dogs is canine H3N2, a different strain than the similarly named human H3N2. Flu season has arrived—for humans and for dogs. As people march into medical centers to nab their annual vaccination, veterinarians across the country are recommending that dog owners consider a similar immunization for their four-legged companions. The canine flu (H3N8) aka “the dog flu” is a contagious respiratory infection that was first discovered in 2004 when the virus jumped from horses and began

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Dog Care

Hit By Car

Dr. Sherry Weaver Do not panic. Let the animal see you approach. Avoid making any sudden movements or loud noises. Speak gently to the animal. Ensure there is no danger of further damage to yourself or pet. Give first aid to any external injuries, minimize movement, and keep the animal warm. Immediate attention is required. Telephone your vet, and take your pet to the hospital immediately.

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Dog Breeds

Hot Spots, Bald Spots And Red Spots On Dogs

Question for the Vet: Three years ago I took my 18 month old female Pomeranian to the vet after a dime sized scab came off her shoulder area. The vet said it was a “hot” spot, however, the hair has not only never grown back in that area but the spot has gotten larger. I can see tiny red spots around the perimeter of the hairless area. Any ideas or treatment options would be greatly appreciated. Thank you. The vet’s answer: The condition you are describing is focal alopecia which is a localized area of hair loss on a dog. Pyotraumatic dermatitis, also

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All About Dogs

Dog First Aid Tips

Accidents can happen at any time, but if you are prepared, serious crisis can be averted. This is an excellent time to familiarize oneself with the basic principles of dog first aid. Always be prepared! Make a dog first aid kit and have it on hand wherever you go. Consider having multiple kits, such as a large fully stocked kit for home and a smaller kit for the car or family outings. For bandaging material, you should keep a roll of gauze (can also be used to create a makeshift muzzle if needed), square gauze, non-stick pads, first aid tape

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All About Dogs

Abrasions On Your Dog

When the top layers of skin have been abraded and tissue under the skin is not disturbed, we refer to this injury as a skin abrasion.  Most superficial scrapes or wounds no longer than an inch or two can be treated with first aid.  Larger or deeper abrasions require professional medical attention.  To treat minor abrasions, be sure your hands are clean. Then gently clip the fur away from the wound. Fur in a healing wound can lead to contamination and delayed healing. Use warm water to flush the wound in order to remove dirt and debris from the area.

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All About Dogs

How to Care for a Dog With Megaesophagus

Dear Dr. Weaver, I recently rescued a puggle from an animal shelter. I soon discovered that he has a condition known as megaesophagus, which, from what I understand, is serious and requires constant vigilance to control. I was assured by my vet that it is not the type of condition that will resolve itself over time and is something that could lead to pneumonia asphyxiation. He was placed on antibiotics, some type of throat syrup, and requires his food elevated to aid in digestion. Is there anything else that I could be doing to help him get through this disorder?

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