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Diagnosing Your Dog

Diagnosing Your Dog

The Scoop In The Poop: Your Dog’s Health Secrets Revealed

It may be an unpleasant reality but a necessary subject. Dog lovers have to deal with their dogs’ poop constantly, whether it’s cleaning up the yard, picking it up on a walk, or (we hope rarely if ever) scrubbing it off of a floor. While it may be tempting to try to look (and smell) the other way while taking care of a dog’s business, there’s actually quite a lot you can learn by paying attention to what’s coming out the other end, because various attributes of dog poop can tell you a lot about the health of your dog

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Diagnosing Your Dog

Warning Signs That Your Dog Has A Heart Problem

Just like people, dogs can suffer from heart issues, and if the problems are serious enough, dogs can even die from them. Protect your dog’s heart health by knowing the common signs and causes, learning how to keep their heart strong, and what to do if a problem exists. Common Symptoms There are several possible symptoms that you may notice if your dog is having heart problems. Obviously, many of them can be related to other causes, but if a number of these symptoms present themselves together heart issues are more likely. Vomiting This is often accompanied by a poor

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Diagnosing Your Dog

10 Early Signs Your Dog May Have Cancer

Early Warning Signs of Cancer There are many early warning signs of cancer in dogs and cats. Some of them can be very vague such as vomiting and diarrhea and others can be very obvious such as large lumps on the body that are easily observed and felt. Cancer is more common in older dogs and cats, but we must remember that even young dogs and cats can develop cancer. As I mentioned above, any obvious lumps or bumps on the body, head or legs could potentially be a cancerous tumor. Hard lumps that are well-attached to underlying tissues are

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Choosing/Working With a Vet

8 Secrets To Stress Free Vet Visits

Vet visits are an essential part of every dog’s life, if only for routine check-ups and yearly vaccinations. With a little careful preparation they needn’t be traumatic — for your dog or you! If you can make your puppy’s first vet visit relaxed, she won’t develop anxiety about future appointments. Your puppy should be comfortable with being touched. Dogs aren’t naturally comfortable with having their tail lifted or their belly, feet, and nails touched. Find a time when your puppy is relaxed and calm and get him used to these actions. If it’s something that he becomes accustomed to with

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