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Symptoms Of Worms In Dogs

Worms are one of the most common health problems for dogs. There are five types of worms that generally affect dogs: heartworms, roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms, and whipworms. Certain types of worms are easier to spot than others. For example, if your dog picks up a tapeworm, it’s common to see what resembles grains of rice in its stool. Heartworms, on the other hand, are harder to diagnose and an infected dog will often show only subtle symptoms until the disease has progressed to a more advanced stage. Here are the 11 most common symptoms of worms in dogs: 1. Coughing

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All About Dogs

Best Heartworm Prevention For Puppies

Few things in life are as exciting or rewarding as welcoming a new puppy into the family. They’re adorable, they’re loving, they’re funny – and they’re also counting on you to help protect them from parasites and diseases. Here’s a quick look at common and preventable parasite and diseases and how you can start heartworm prevention. Heartworm Disease Transmission  Heartworms are transmitted by mosquitos, and the worms live in the heart and lungs of the dog. Clinical signs seen in dogs include cough, difficulty breathing, weight loss, exercise intolerance, and eventually heart failure and death. Unlike intestinal parasites, which can

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All About Dogs

Heartworms In Dogs: Myths VS. Facts

  How heartworms are spread All dogs are at risk for potentially deadly heartworm disease. Heartworms live in the heart and blood vessels of the lungs of dogs, cats and other mammals like wolves, foxes and coyotes. Heartworms cannot be spread directly from animal to animal without a mosquito as an intermediary. Heartworms are spread when a mosquito bites an infected dog and picks up tiny larvae called microfilariae from the dog’s bloodstream. Then that mosquito bites another dog infecting it with the heartworm larvae. Over the next several months the heartworm larvae grow and migrate to the heart and lungs.

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All About Dogs

Intestinal Parasites

Roundworms and hookworms Most pet owners do not know their pets may carry worms capable of infecting people.1 Infected dogs contaminate their surroundings by passing eggs in feces. People can acquire roundworm and hookworm infections by coming into contact with an environment contaminated with eggs or larvae. That means it’s important to clean up pet feces on a regular basis to remove potentially infectious eggs before they spread through the environment. Eggs in the environment can remain infectious for years.1 Children are more likely to become infected in part because they are more apt to play in contaminated areas or put

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Roundworms

Parasite profile Roundworms may resemble earthworms, but they’re much more dangerous, especially when they get inside a dog, or a person. The roundworm is a patient, persistent parasite that can lay up to 100,000eggs in a single day.1 Once an egg is accidentally ingested by a dog, the roundworm hatches and makes its way through the body to an ideal feeding ground, the intestine. Targets Dogs: Most puppies are infected with roundworms transmitted from their mothers prior to or just after birth and through nursing. Dogs and puppies can also be infected with roundworms by consuming infected animals or eggs in

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All About Dogs

Hookworms

Parasite profile Hookworms are dangerous parasites that live in a dog’s small intestine. With remarkable efficiency, hookworms “graze” on the lining of the intestine, leaving multiple bloody holes in their wake. These can lead to anemia and may even cause a small puppy to bleed to death. In humans, hookworms migrate through tissue close to the skin, causing painful, itchy rashes. Three common hookworms are: Ancylostoma caninum is the most pathogenic hookworm and can cause anemia in infected dogs. Like other hookworms, it poses a zoonotic threat to humans and can cause creeping eruptions. Ancylostoma braziliense is a species of

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All About Dogs

Staph Infection Contagious To Humans?

I recently adopted a male Westie mix from a local shelter. As suggested, I took him to my vet just to make sure he was healthy. Magnum had a rash on his back leg, and after careful examination, the vet concluded that he had a Staph infection. She gave me some antibiotics and ointment to treat him. I know that humans can spread Staph infections, but can I get it from my dog? Can my other dogs get it from him? Thanks in advance, Summer Dear Summer, There are many species of Staph bacteria. While there are contagious species, most

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