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Dog Care

Garden Dangers For Dogs: Common Plants That Can Kill

Unlike their feline counterparts, dogs aren’t strict carnivores. They have evolved with a scavenging instinct, causing them to eat whatever might fulfill their nutritional needs. They also have a penchant for exploring the world around them with their mouth. Unfortunately, as many Pack Leaders know, this results in dogs eating many things that aren’t very good for them. Dark chocolate, moldy garbage, and even rat poison are all dangerous items that dogs can and will eat inside the house given the chance. But outside in the garden, there are plants that can pose a threat to your pup as well.

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Diagnosing Your Dog

10 Early Signs Your Dog May Have Cancer

Early Warning Signs of Cancer There are many early warning signs of cancer in dogs and cats. Some of them can be very vague such as vomiting and diarrhea and others can be very obvious such as large lumps on the body that are easily observed and felt. Cancer is more common in older dogs and cats, but we must remember that even young dogs and cats can develop cancer. As I mentioned above, any obvious lumps or bumps on the body, head or legs could potentially be a cancerous tumor. Hard lumps that are well-attached to underlying tissues are

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All About Dogs

Dog Constipation: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatments

  As one of the most common digestive problems among animals, constipation — the difficulty or inability to have normal bowel movements — can affect dogs of all breeds, ages, and lifestyles. While constipation may be common in dogs, it should never be ignored. Left untreated, constipation can cause more serious health problems in the future, including lethargy, loss of appetite, and vomiting. Below is a guide to understanding the causes of constipation, recognizing the symptoms, and treating your pet. Causes of dog constipation A variety of different factors can contribute to constipation in your pet. Some of the most

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Dog Care

3 Things To Do When Your Dog May Be Poisoned

Chocolate cake. Tulips. Wine. These are just a few of the seemingly harmless household items that can be harmful if ingested by your dog. As a Pack Leader, it’s important to be aware of the many common substances that can be poisonous for your dog, as well as steps you can take to both prevent and treat dog poisoning. Common causes of dog poisoning Safe for humans doesn’t necessarily mean safe for dogs. In fact, many of the foodstuffs, medications, and products you keep in your house can be highly toxic to your dog. Below, we’ve listed some of the

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What To Do If Your Dog Eats Something It Shouldn’t

  Have you ever heard the expression “eat like a dog” or “dogs eat anything?” Ever wonder where those stem from? If you own a dog, you know firsthand that from time to time they get curious and occasionally try to ingest something that they shouldn’t. We’ve all heard horror stories of a dog having to be rushed to the ER to have his stomach pumped, or know of a person whose pup has passed a foreign object and was back to normal immediately after. What should you do if your dog eats something that he shouldn’t? Should you take

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Diarrhea

By Dr. Sherry Weaver Diarrhea is the frequent and repetitive passage of loose, watery stool. Your judgment regarding the health status of a pet with diarrhea is critical. Bloody diarrhea with severe straining may be an emergency especially for small dogs. Diarrhea along with vomiting can be signs of serious intestinal obstruction that may even need surgery. Weakness, pain, vomiting, or agitation are serious signs that the pet needs medical attention-not simply a little first aid! A pet with diarrhea but with few other signs of distress may sometimes be treated at home, but the variables are so numerous that

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How To Care For Burn Wounds On Dogs

The majority of burn wounds in dogs occur in the home and are categorized as thermal (heat), chemical and electrical. Superficial thermal burns can be treated by immersion of the affected skin in cold water or by applying an ice pack. Then remove any hair or debris from the burn wound and gently pat dry. Do not use oil-based medications on a burn wound. A non-stick telfa pad can then be applied followed by a light bandage to hold it in place. If the burn wound becomes infected or is not healing, veterinary care is needed. Deep thermal burns extend

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All About Dogs

New Canine Cancer Blood Test Available

The National Canine Cancer Foundation in Phoenix has announced that a new, simple blood test is now available for dog lovers to confirm veterinary suspicion of cancer in their pets. Developed by Veterinary Diagnostics Institute, which is a reference laboratory based in Simi Valley, California, the test is called VDI TKcanine+. It is used by veterinarians to measure two compounds in the dog’s blood: the thymidine kinase (or TK) level, which indicates unusually rapid cell division; and levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), which indicates when inflammation is present. Together, these measurements detect cancer in its early stages before signs become

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Dog Care

How To Recognize And Treat Foot Pad Injuries In Dogs

  Foot Pad Injuries Foot pad injuries in dogs can range from abrasions, blisters, burns, ulcers, tears, punctures and lacerations. It is important to be aware what type of surface your dog walks on. Concrete for example can be rough and heats up quickly during warm or hot weather. Rock, gravel and sand can also injure the foot pads. The common clinical signs are limping, licking at the foot or bleeding. Home care for mild abrasions include gently rinsing the affected foot under cool water to remove any debris, followed by the application an antibacterial ointment or solution, like Neosporin.

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All About Dogs

Keeping Fido Fit, Not Fat

Our pets weigh too much. According to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention’s latest veterinary survey, 53 percent of adult dogs and 55 percent of adult cats in the United States — that’s 88.4 million pets — are classified as overweight or obese by their veterinarians. But the bigger problem, reports APOP founder Dr. Ernie Ward, is that pet owners don’t even realize their chubby four-legged friends have a weight problem. “Twenty two percent of dog owners and fifteen percent of cat owners characterized their pet as ‘normal weight’ when it was actually overweight or obese,” Dr. Ward says. “This

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